Daily Archives: September 7, 2017

Ricardo Marin Ruiz and “Cycling in Spain”

Our first speaker in this year’s Far Away Places series is a native of Albacete, a market town located in Southern Spain, where his family has lived for generations in a region immortalized in Cervantes’ Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Growing up he thought of becoming an actor but then turned his attentions to the more practical field of English philology.  He studied Humanities at the University of Castilla-La Mancha where he later earned a doctorate in English philology in 2007.  He currently teaches English at the School of Industrial Engineering at this same school.

His research interests are in the field of comparative literature, especially on American and British authors since the nineteenth century, such as George Orwell and Ernest Hemingway.  These two writers are discussed in his recent book and in a past talk he gave in this series a podcast of which has been one of our most popular.  An avid cycler who takes part in many races as part of an amateur cycling team, the focus of his next talk is on Spanish cycling.

Over the last 150 years, cycling has played an important role in the sport tradition of many European countries. Nowadays, this sport has turned into a relevant social, economic, and cultural phenomenon, not only in Europe, but also in other geographical and cultural contexts, particularly in English-speaking countries outside the Old Continent. Spain, which is among the nations with the longest cycling traditions, has not been an exception to this trend in which cycling is going beyond its traditional competitive nature to become the starting point of new social, cultural, and economic patterns.

In his talk he’ll explore the historical origins and later development: more specifically,  how what we know today as cycling began in Spain by the end of the 19th century and how its later development was influenced to a great extent by the Tour of Spain (La Vuelta a España) as well as the incredible performance of several Spanish riders, who have raced in some of the best teams in the world. Then, its current condition as social and cultural phenomenon and as generator of economic growth.  Lastly, the talk will finish with a brief account of a personal experience that may well be an example of how cycling can be a passion and almost a way of life.

We hope you’ll join us on Thursday, September 21 at 7:00 p.m. at Barnes & Noble Bookstore (1680 Campbell Lane).

 

 

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Filed under Events, Far Away Places, General, Latest News, People

Eclipse Stories

After the solar eclipse on August 21, the Manuscripts & Folklife Archives of WKU’s Department of Library Special Collections received many photos and impressions of this rare event for our “Tell Us About Your Eclipse Day” project. Here are a few samples:

Everything just began to look slightly faded, like an old Polaroid photo.  It got noticeably cooler as the moon crept across the sun.  Crescents appeared in tree-leaved shadows.  Streetlights winked on along the streets.  — Roxanne Spencer

From Andrea Ford - crescent shaped lighting though trees

From Andrea Ford

“The Sun is setting Early!” exclaimed our six year old son; as he watched with wonder, on the solar telescope he helped build.  “Dad, will I be around to see the next one?” — Quentin Hughes

From Deana Groves (5th graders, W.R. McNeill Elementary)

From Deana Groves (5th graders, W.R. McNeill Elementary)

I could feel the mist coming off the trees.  I’ve noticed this before, the leaves’ expiration–the misting feeling that you get when you walk under trees at dusk. — Sue Ferrell

Around noon, I noticed people clamoring to look out windows in the Hancock Tower in downtown Chicago.  I ran outside to meet some friends and scarf down my lunch, all while staring upward at the eclipse. . . . There were a ton of people gathered around on the streets and sidewalks, but amazingly life went on throughout Michigan Avenue. — Aaron Straka

Eclip?  Eclip?  Dark. . . dark. . . dark. . . sky!  Moon a bye bye!  Sun. . . color black! — Penny Nimmo, age 2-1/2

Young child looking through solar viewer

From Rebecca Nimmo

I love[d] the sound of cheering by the kids in Smith Stadium and those who were on South Lawn.  That was simply awesome. — Andrea Ford

Moments before totality the street lamps came on, dragonflies swarmed the grassy parks of Reservoir Hill, the crickets began to chirp and the sound of the cicadas grew deafening.  The air became cooler and the winds picked up.  The quality of the light was unreal–like the strange, luminous glow that falls upon the treetops just after a thunderstorm. — Marla Zubel

From William Sledge - totality

From William Sledge

As quickly as night fell, morning came.  We witnessed a new day twice on August 21st.  I was in awe of the flocks of birds flying from the trees to welcome the “morning.”  My internal clock had me feeling strange, yet peaceful in those moments. — Mary Johnson

Anticipation can sometimes overshadow the actual occurrence.  Not this time. — Lorraine Baushke

It’s not too late to contribute your memories and photos.  Click here to find out how.

pinhole projected image on map of Kentucky

From Larry Isenberg

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Filed under Manuscripts & Folklife Archives